Annual Report 2008

   

    
 

  Contents  Introduction  EECM  Tripartite Meeting  |  RPCM  16th Annual Meeting BASIS Symposium  |  People & Events  |  Appendices 
 

     

 
 
»  16th Annual Meeting
 
 
1. Time and Place of the Meeting
2. Participants
3. Agenda
4. Opening Remarks
5. Consideration of Enforcement
6. Consideration of Scientific     Research & Statistics
   (1) Scientific Research Activities
   (2) Salmon Catches
        2.1 Canada
        2.2 Japan
        2.3 Korea
        2.4 Russia
        2.5 United States
   (3) Salmon Enhancement
   (4) Coordination of Activities
   (5) Sample and Data          Exchanges
   (6) Project Proposals for         External Fundraising
   (7) 2009 Work Plan
   (8) Cooperation
   (9) Publications
7. Administrative & Fiscal Matters
8. News Release
9. Closing Remarks
 
 6 Consideration of Scientific Research and Statistics 
   
(1)  Scientific Research Activities

 

  Doc. 1077 lists the titles of all documents submitted to the Commission from the adjournment of the 2007 Annual Meeting to November 2008.  A total of 51 documents (4 from Canada, 13 from Japan, 3 from Korea, 14 from Russia, 14 from the United States, and 3 from the CSRS) were submitted for the consideration of scientific research and statistics.  Abstracts for the documents were compiled by the Secretariat (Doc. 1141).  Each Party made presentations of the selected documents for significant scientific discussions.

As regards to Doc. 1105, it was declared by the Russian Party that the Russian data used in the document was not officially approved or authorized.  Therefore, the Russian Federation carries no responsibility for the authenticity or reliability of the above mentioned material.

 

(2)  Salmon Catches

 

 
Table 1. 

Preliminary 2007 commercial salmon catches in Canada, Japan, Korea, Russia, and the United StatesCommercial catches by foreign fleets in the Russian EEZ are not included.
 

(a) Preliminary 2007 commercial catch in millions of fish.

 

Sockeye

 Pink

   Chum

Coho

Chinook

Cherry

      Total

 

Canada

  0.646

6.207  

1.010   

0.276

0.182

-

8.321

Japan

  0.001

15.557  

60.727  

0.006

0.009

NA*1

76.300

Korea

     -

  -

0.056    - -

-

0.056

Russia

10.852

183.763  

17.280  

1.191

0.137

   0.005  

213.227

USA

47.468

144.088  

17.243  

3.705

0.758

-

213.262

   Alaska

47.468

144.087  

17.243  

3.642

0.569

-

213.009

   WOC*2

  0.000

0.001  

0.000  

0.063

0.189

-

0.253

Total

58.966

349.615  

96.316  

5.177

1.086

   0.005

511.165

 
*1 NA: Not Available
*2 WOC: Washington, Oregon, and California.

 

(b) Preliminary 2007 commercial catch in tonnes (round weight).

   

Sockeye

Pink

Chum

Coho

Chinook

Cherry

  Total

Canada

1,760

11,197

4,861

812

1,324

-

19,954

Japan

1

21,380

198,260

16

45

1,133

220,835

Korea

-

-

146

-

-

-

146

Russia

30,082

259,829

54,272

3,711

801

11

348,706

USA*1

126,800

228,993

59,201

11,290

5,000

-

431,283

   Alaska

126,800

228,991

59,201

11,130

3,916

-

430,038

   WOC

0

1

0

161

1,084

-

1,246

Total

158,642

521,399

316,740

15,829

7,169

1,144

1,020,923

*1 USA data were submitted in pounds and converted into tonnes (1 mt = 2,204.59 lbs.)

 

2.1    Canada (Doc. 1120)

During 2007, Canadian Pacific salmon fisheries were again managed with a strong emphasis on conservation, with the result that many of the catches were relatively modest. Canada reported preliminary estimates for retained commercial catch (numbers and total weight), recreational catch (numbers only) and aboriginal catch (numbers only) for the five major salmon species caught in British Columbia tidal waters from 1952 (commercial), 1953 (recreational), or 1951 aboriginal) to 2007. Catches include non-Canadian fish caught in British Columbia and exclude Canadian fish caught outside British Columbia.  Some changes from previous documents resulted from ongoing efforts to standardize estimation approaches. Commercial estimates are sale slip based, and have been labeled as “preliminary” since 1996 because of problems with the sale slip program including non-compliance and misreporting.  The primary findings are that i) revised estimates tend to be higher than earlier estimates, and ii) differences between the two sets of estimates are generally modest in the early period but increase through the time series. Although revised estimates, and the approaches used to generate these have been presented to the Canada’s peer review system (PSARC), at the time of writing, this review has not been completed. We are therefore not able to recommend changes to the Canadian time series of commercial catch data.

 

 
2.2    Japan (Doc. 1140)

Japan reported total commercial catches of Pacific salmon by coastal and offshore areas in 2007 by number and weight. Total catches in coastal and offshore areas of Japan include 60.7 million (198.3 thousand tonnes) chum and 15.6 million (21.4 thousand tonnes) pink salmon.

 

 
2.3    Korea (Doc. 1131)

Total catch of chum salmon was 91,551 fish or 238.9 metric tonnes in 2007. Among these, 55,788 fish or 145.6 tonnes were caught from the coastal areas for the commercial purpose (i.e., mostly set-net fishery) and 35,763 fish or 93.3 tonnes from the river for artificial propagation in hatcheries. Most of chum salmon were caught in the coastal area of Korea (60.9%) and rivers (39.1%) in Gangwon Province. Average weight of chum salmon in 2007 was 2.61 kg while those in 2004, 2005, and 2006 were 3.38 kg, 2.42 kg, and 2.25, respectively.

 

 
2.4    Russia (Doc. 1136)

The coastal catches of Pacific salmon in the Russian Far East totaled 348,706 tonnes, or 213.227 million fish in 2007, which were highest on record. The main species caught were pink salmon (259,829 tonnes), followed by chum (54,272 tonnes), sockeye (30,081 tonnes), coho (3,711 tonnes), chinook (801 tonnes), and masu salmon (11 tonnes).

 

 
2.5    United States 
 
(i)    Alaska (Doc. 1135)

At this time last year, department biologists were expecting an all-species commercial catch of 179 million for the 2007 season. As it turned out, the all-species catch reached 213 million. The 2007 catch was well above forecast and ranked as the 4th largest salmon catch for the State of Alaska since 1960. In 2007, the overall catch of pink salmon was 144 million compared to the preseason projection of 108 million. Higher than expected pink salmon catch in 2007 was due to a record pink salmon return to Prince William Sound. The overall chum salmon catch was 17.2 million compared to the preseason projection of 24.8 million. The 2007 ex-vessel value of the commercial harvest showed a large increase over the value of the catch in 2006. The preliminary estimate for the total value of Alaska’s 2007 harvest is $417 million well above the $346 million in 2006, and while below record highs it is the greatest since $487 million in 1995.

 
(ii)    Washington, Oregon, California, and Idaho (Doc. 1134)

Ocean salmon fisheries conducted off the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California are directed toward, and harvest primarily chinook and coho salmon. Small numbers of pink salmon are harvested in odd numbered years. West Coast fisheries in the Pacific Fishery Management Council-managed waters occur from 0 to 200 nautical miles offshore between the United States/Canada border and the United States /Mexico border. Total 2007 exvessel value for the non-Indian commercial salmon fisheries within Washington, Oregon and California was $11.6 million, an increase of 24% from 2006 (Pacific Fishery Management Council 2008). In terms of number of fish, the non-Indian commercial chinook salmon harvest (163,000 fish) increased by 34% compared to 2006, however, the number of chinook salmon harvested was 78% below the long-term average (751,000 fish). Coho salmon catch increased in 2007 to 23,000 fish, over eight times the 2,700 coho salmon recorded in 2006. Average weight per chinook salmon was slightly less than the previous year (8%), while the coho salmon average weight decreased by over 30%. Treaty Indian commercial fisheries off Washington are allocated a share of the total ocean salmon harvest. The treaty Indian commercial fisheries (inclusive of Ceremonial and Subsistence) harvested 25,600 chinook salmon, and 40,000 coho salmon. While the chinook salmon catch was less than the total catch in 2006, the coho salmon catch was an improvement.
 

 

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