Annual Report 2009

   

    
 

  Contents  Introduction  EECM  Enforcement Workshop  |  RPCM  17th Annual Meeting People & Events  |  Appendices 
 

     

 
 
»  RPCM
 
 
1. Time and Place of the Meeting
2. Participants
3. Research Plans and Cruise     Activities
    (a) National Research Plans  
    (b) Cruise Plans  
             Canada  
             Japan  
             Korea  
             Russia  
             United States  
4. Exchange Samples and Data
5. Sub-Committee and Working     Group Reports
6. Project Proposals for      External Fund-Raising
7. Symposia
 
3. 2009 National Research Plans and Cruise Activities
    
(a)    National Research Plans
 
Canada stated that the Canadian National Research Plan remains unchanged from those in the past several years.

Canada conducts and publishes studies on the biology and ecology of Pacific salmon to support the conservation and management of the stocks as well as to foster and contribute to international cooperative research. Areas of research include the impacts of climate change on salmon production, stock and species identification using DNA techniques, and studies on the biology, physiology and ecology of Pacific salmon.

The Japanese National Research Plan was submitted at the 16th (2008) Annual Meeting (Doc. 1148, pages 17–18), and no changes to the research plan are expected until 2010. The sampling stations and other details may be adjusted from year to year but those changes will be reported each year.

Korea reported that there are no changes to the Korean National Research Plan submitted at the 16th Annual Meeting (Docs. 1054 and 1148, pages 18–19).

There will be no changes to the Russian National Research Plan submitted at the 16th Annual Meeting (Docs. 1069 and 1148, pages 19–21) as it is for 5 years (2006-2010).

The United States Research Plan remains the same as that which was submitted at the 16th Annual Meeting (Doc. 1148, pages 21–22).

 

(b)    Cruise Plans
 
  Canada (Doc. 1166)
 
Three surveys have been planned by the Canadian Program on High Seas Salmon for 2009–2010: a summer survey on June 18 – July 6, 2009, a fall survey on October 8 – November 17, 2009, and a winter survey on February 2 – March 2, 2010. The primary objectives of these surveys will be to (1) collect biological information on Pacific salmon and associated epipelagic fish community, (2) describe the ambient oceanographic conditions, and (3) quantify the biomass of zooplankton and describe zooplankton species community composition in coastal waters of British Columbia and Southeast Alaska.

 

Japan (Docs. 1159, 1160)
 
Japan reviewed salmon research cruise plans (Doc. 1159) and research cruises that may involve incidental takes of salmon (Doc.1160) scheduled for the 2009/2010 fiscal year.
 
1)  Hokko maru will conduct research with a surface/midwater trawl and hook-and-line to obtain information on the distribution, abundance and other biological characteristic of summering salmon in the Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea from early July to mid August.
 
2) Oshoro maru will conduct research with gillnets, longline, hook-and-line and surface/bottom trawl to obtain data on the distribution and ecology of salmon and other pelagic fishes in the western North Pacific Ocean in May, and in the central North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea from early July to late August.
 
3) Wakatake maru will conduct research with gillnets and longline to obtain data on the distribution and abundance of salmon along 180° longitude in the central North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea from early June to late July.
 
4) Kaiun maru will conduct research with gillnets to obtain data on the distribution and ecology of neon flying squid, salmon and other pelagic fishes in the western and central North Pacific Ocean from early July to early August.

 

Korea
 
Korea has no research plan in the ocean.

 

Russia (Doc. 1161)
 
Russia described three research cruise plans for Pacific salmon marine life period studies in 2009 (Doc. 1161).
 
1)  Cruise plan for Pacific salmon marine period of life research in the salmon wintering area
 
  Winter Pacific salmon studies in the subarctic waters of North Pacific Ocean between 155ºE and 170ºW are conducted by R/V TINRO from February 7 to April 26, 2009. The major objectives are to: 1) determine the current status of Pacific salmon in the pelagic ecosystems; 2) elucidate Pacific salmon position and role in the trophic structure of epipelagic zone; 3) evaluate pelagic ecosystem status as well as oceanic and overall ecological conditions during winter and spring; and 4) estimate salmon mortality during fall and winter.
 
2) Cruise plan for Pacific salmon marine period of life research during their anadromous migrations
 
  Studies during Pacific salmon anadromous migrations were planned in the Bering Sea, Okhotsk Sea and adjacent Pacific waters. The major purpose of these studies is the estimation of anadromous Pacific salmon abundance and biomass for short-term forecasting of their returns and possible catch. The cruise of R/V TINRO is planned to conduct in the western Bering Sea in June 15–July 31, 2009. The cruise of R/V Professor Kaganovsky will be carried out in the North Pacific waters near the Okhotsk Sea in June 1-July 10, 2009. The cruise of R/V Professor Levanidov is planned to conduct in the southern Okhotsk Sea in July 3-31, 2009.
 
3) Cruise plan for Pacific salmon marine period of life research during their catadromous migrations
 
  Studies during Pacific salmon catadromous migrations were planned in the Bering Sea and Okhotsk Sea. The major purpose of these studies is the estimation of anadromous Pacific salmon abundance and biomass for forecasting of their returns and possible catch in the next years. The first phase of R/V Professor Kaganovsky cruise (September 11-October 15, 2009) will be devoted to the catadromous migrations of Pacific salmon in the western Bering Sea. The second phase (October 18-November 15, 2009) are planned to study the catadromous migrations of Pacific salmon in the southern Okhotsk Sea.

SakhNIRO will conduct surveys of juvenile salmon near Sakhalin. KamchatNIRO will conduct trawl surveys near Kamchatka shores to predict the life history and behaviour of pink salmon.

 

United States (Docs. 1153, 1156)
 
The United States presented cruise plans for the eastern Bering Sea (Doc. 1156) and Southeast Alaska coastal monitoring (SECM; Doc. 1153) for 2009.  The NOAA ship Oscar Dyson will be used to collect biological information on ecologically important fish species and provide descriptions of the physical and biological oceanographic conditions of the eastern Bering Sea waters during the fall of 2009.  Fish samples will be collected using a midwater rope trawl.  At each station, the net will be towed at or near the surface for 30 minutes at speeds between 3.5 and 5 kts.  All fish species will be counted and standard biological measurements including length and weight will be taken from subsamples of each species.  Diets of subsamples of marine fish will be examined onboard.  Biological and physical oceanographic data will be collected at each trawl station as well as opportunistically during the survey.

In 2009, SECM research is scheduled to be conducted in the northern region at up to 13 core stations during four intervals from late May to late August, and in the southern region at eight stations in late June and late July. This sampling schedule is similar to what was done in 2005, 2006, and 2007.  One additional component in July will involve another inter-vessel calibration of CPUE with the R/V Medeia.  The charter vessel to be compared with the R/V Medeia for this operation remains to be determined. Charter vessels will be used to replace the historical services of the NOAA ship John N. Cobb, which was decommissioned in 2008, until a permanent replacement vessel is available.  Thus, the vessel calibration effort is necessary to maintain the comparability between historical and future data collections and to account for differences in CPUE between vessels.
 

 

4. Exchange of Biological Samples and Data
    
List of requests for samples and data is appended as Appendix 2.

 

 

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