Page 126 - Annual Report 2011

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126
19
th
A
nnual
M
eeting
IV. NPAFC I
nternational
W
orkshop on
E
xplanations
for
the
H
igh
A
bundance of
P
ink and
C
hum
S
almon and
F
iture
T
rends
Total commercial catches of Pacific salmon (
Oncorhynchus
spp.) in the Subarctic North Pacific are at historic high levels,
with recent catches over one million tonnes. High catches were
caused by an increase of pink and chum salmon production,
which represented over 80% of the total catch. At the same
time Chinook, coho, and masu salmon have been decreasing
in abundance. These trends in Pacific salmon catches are
generally recognized to result from processes within the ocean
that appear to improve the capacity to produce pink and chum
salmon, perhaps decrease the capacity to produce Chinook
and coho salmon, and contribute to recent extreme variability
in sockeye salmon production. Understanding how future
trends in ocean production capacity will change is important
for hatchery programs, salmon industry, fishery managers, and
conservation plans.
To identify what is known about the reasons for recent
production trends and to identify future research needs, the
North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission (NPAFC) hosted
an international workshop on “
Explanations for the High
Abundance of Pink and Chum Salmon and Future Trends
on October 30-31, 2011, at the Vancouver Island Conference
Centre in Nanaimo, BC, Canada. The workshop was co-
sponsored by organizations concerned with salmon fisheries,
conservation, and understanding North Pacific ecosystems.
These organizations included the following: Bering Sea
Fishermen’s Association, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, North
Pacific Marine Science Organization, North Pacific Research
Board, Pacific Fisheries Resource Conservation Council,
Pacific Salmon Foundation, and State of the Salmon. Over 100
international experts, scientists, fisheries officials, and industry
representatives attended the workshop.
Oral presentation at the Workshop
Photo by NPAFC Secretariat